How To Store Chocolate Long Term? (guide for proper storage & more)

Guess what… I have awesome news. You can store chocolate in your pantry for a long time, whether you’re a baker or just want to take advantage of those post-holiday chocolate discounts.

 

This leads us to the question: how to store chocolate long term? After doing the research, here’s what I uncovered…

 

Best Methods:

 

  • Do not store it inside your freezer! Storage Instructions: Store in a cool, dry location.

  • FYI: cocoa butter (the vegetable fat found in chocolate) absorbs the fragrance of whatever is in its immediate vicinity.

  • Do not expose to direct sunlight!

  • Put your chocolate in an airtight container to keep them fresh.

 

 

After conducting more investigation, I discovered additional facts that you should be aware of, so please continue reading…

 

 

Chocolate Has a Long Shelf Life


Chocolate has a shelf life of roughly 9-24 months when properly stored. It varies based on the type of chocolate used and the conditions under which it is stored.

 

Dark chocolate, followed by plain milk chocolate, has the longest shelf life of any type of chocolate. White chocolate and chocolates with fillings have a lower shelf life than other types of chocolate.

 

Please keep in mind that these shelf life recommendations do not indicate when the chocolate may become harmful to consume. Rather, they serve as a guideline for how long it will take for the chocolate to bloom, alter texture, or turn rancid if left out in the open.

 

Temperatures ranging from 26.6 degrees Fahrenheit to 64.4 degrees Fahrenheit are considered temperate. Tropical conditions prevail with temperatures exceeding 64.4°F.

 

 

Is it possible for chocolate to go bad?


Plain chocolate, on the other hand, does not typically go bad in the sense of becoming harmful to consume. This is due to the fact that chocolate has relatively little moisture and is thus deemed “microbiologically harmless.”

 

However, if chocolate is kept for an extended period of time, the fats can become rancid and give it a terrible flavor…

The good news is that because chocolate includes natural antioxidants in the form of cocoa, it does not become rancid as rapidly as other fatty foods such as powdered milk and frying oil. When chocolate is kept for an extended period of time, it can alter in look and texture.

 

The fats and sugars can migrate to the exterior of the chocolate, causing “bloom,” which is a yellowish film to form on the outside of the bar. It is still safe to consume, but it does not appear to be as appetizing.

 

Is it OK to consume chocolate that has expired?


It is normally safe to consume chocolate that has beyond its expiration date. Although it may have an unpleasant sour taste if the lipids have begun to go rancid it should not make you sick.

 

There have been a few isolated occurrences of chocolate-related Salmonella sickness, but it is extremely improbable that you would develop food poisoning from eating chocolate that has gone bad.

 

Be on the watch for any indicators of bacterial development, such as a fuzzy green film on the chocolate, in order to be extra cautious. Chocolate bloom can be mistaken for bacterium growth, which is understandable.

 

How to Keep Chocolate Fresh for a Long Period of Time (top 3 tips)


1. Keep It Cool

 

When it comes to long-term chocolate storage, temperature is the most critical factor to consider. The lipids in chocolate can go rancid if they are exposed to high temperatures. Keep the chocolate in a cold spot that is less than room temperature to prevent it from melting.

2. Repackage the product in an airtight container

 

The presence of oxygen will cause the lipids in chocolate to oxidize as well. It is also possible that exposure to humid air will cause the chocolate to become moist, which might allow germs to thrive in the chocolate. You may avoid this by repackaging the chocolate in an airtight container after it has been eaten. Using mylar bags with oxygen absorbers is the most effective method. In the long run, vacuum sealing bags are not an effective option since they will ultimately allow air and moisture to get through. Normally, you would have to remove the food from its original packing before placing it in Mylar bags or containers. With chocolate, however, this is not the case: you may place the wrapped bars immediately inside the Mylar bag. The reason for this is that, in contrast to packages of crackers or cereal, there is very little air surrounding a chocolate bar when it is wrapped.

 

3. If the product is kept in its original packaging

 

While Mylar and oxygen absorbers are the most effective long-term storage methods for chocolate, you may also just preserve chocolate in its original package. In this situation, you must ensure that it is stored in a cold, dry, and dark environment. The ideal situation would be for you to rotate through the chocolate every two years. While this certainly restricts the quantity of chocolate you can keep on hand in case of an emergency, it is a necessary evil.

 

Related Questions:


1. For how long does chocolate remain fresh when kept at room temperature?

 

When you take it out of the refrigerator, allow it to get to room temperature before unwrapping it. Three to six months is the maximum amount of time that your chocolates will remain edible. You may also save information for extended periods of time: from six months to a year, depending on your needs.

2. What is the shelf life of milk chocolate when not refrigerated?

 

What is the shelf life of milk chocolate when kept at room temperature? Milk chocolate will normally retain its finest quality for around 1 year when stored at normal room temperature if it is properly stored.

 

3. What is the best way to keep chocolate chips for a long period of time?

 

 

Final Thoughts


So, what did we learn in class today? We now know that properly kept chocolate has a shelf life of 9 to 24 months. It varies depending on the type of chocolate used and the storage circumstances.

 

Dark chocolate has the longest shelf life of any variety of chocolate, followed by plain milk chocolate. The shelf life of white chocolate and chocolates with fillings is less than that of other forms of chocolate.

 

FYI: these shelf life estimates do not indicate when the chocolate will become unsafe to eat. Instead, they serve as a guide for how long the chocolate will bloom, change texture, or turn rancid if left out in the open.

 

Also, chocolate that has beyond its expiration date is usually safe to eat. If the lipids have begun to get rancid, it may have an unpleasant sour taste, but it should not make you sick.

 

Although there have been a few sporadic cases of chocolate-related Salmonella illness, it is exceedingly unlikely that you would get food poisoning by eating spoiled chocolate.

 

To be extra cautious, keep an eye out for any signs of bacterial growth, such as a fuzzy green film on the chocolate. It’s reasonable if the chocolate bloom is misinterpreted for bacterial growth. Enjoy the rest of your day, always stay safe, and treat others with kindness and respect. Until next time!

How To Store Chocolate Long Term? (guide for proper storage & more)